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Stone Sculpture and Restoration

Classically trained, Original sculpture, handcrafted, Made in the USA.

Kevin William Fehlenberg demonstrates how to refine sculptural details in stone.

  • Limestone charioteer head, which Kevin William Fehlenberg was commissioned by University of Illinois to carve.

    Kevin William Fehlenberg hand-carved this limestone charioteer head as part of a stone restoration project.

  • Damaged limestone charioteer head, which Kevin Fehlenberg was commissioned by University of Illinois to replace.

    University of Illinois commissioned Kevin William Fehlenberg to replace this damaged limestone charioteer head.

  • Allerton Park Charioteer of Delphi stone sculpture

    The charioteer is one of a pair guarding the entrance to Allerton Park, which is part of University of Illinois. This is the other charioteer. The original pair was carved and installed around the turn of the 20th century.

  • Damaged Charioteer of Delphi

    Someone had tried to steal the head of this charioteer, but in the process shattered it into multiple pieces and damaged it beyond repair.

  • Process photo of charioteer head - starting from a block of stone

    Fehlenberg started with a square block of stone and started carving away the excess stone.

  • Replacement charioteer head - starting from a block of stone

    Fehlenberg roughed out the general shape of the charioteer head.

  • Process photo of replacement charioteer head and original head

    This process photo shows the progress of Fehlenberg's replacement charioteer head (on left) next to the original damaged head (on right).

  • Process photo of replacement Charioteer of Delphi head

    Fehlenberg finished carving the nose, mouth and cheeks. He is beginning to carve the eyes.

  • Process photo of replacement Charioteer of Delphi head

    There is still some work to do on the eyes and face, but at this point, in the spirit of Michelangelo, Fehlenberg "released" the complete face from its block of stone.

  • Original Ancient Greek bronze Charioteer of Delphi

    Original Ancient Greek bronze Charioteer of Delphi, which inspired the original limestone sculpture.

  • Kevin Fehlenberg installing the charioteer head

    Fehlenberg is seen making a very precise, thin joint in attaching the head to its body. Fehlenberg will return in the spring to color match the stone after University of Illinois cleans the statue's body.

  • The final charioteer head, installed at Robert Allerton Park

    The University of Illinois charioteer stone restoration project is complete.

  • Original poorly-constructed composite stone urn next to part of the handcrafted replacement urn, carved in high-quality limestone

    Original poorly manufactured urn (on right) next to part of one of the handcrafted replacement urns hand-carved by Kevin Fehlenberg.

  • Process photo of Fehlenberg sculpting a stone urn

    Process photo of Kevin William Fehlenberg sculpting a stone urn.

  • Process photo of carving an urn cover

    This process photo shows the urn cover detail being carved.

  • Stone urn cover, midway through the stone carving process

    Stone urn cover, midway through the stone carving process.

  • Ornamental stone urns

    Finished ornamental stone urns

  • Early stage of hand-carving the stone urns

    Every cut you see here was hand-carved by Kevin Fehlenberg with a chisel. No saws or grinders were used. (This is an urn before any detail work.)

  • stone urn covers and drawing

    Stone urn covers and a graphite study drawn by Kevin Fehlenberg.

  • Original urn base next to a handcrafted replacement urn base hand-carved by Kevin Fehlenberg.

    Original urn base (on left) next to a handcrafted replacement urn base hand-carved by Kevin Fehlenberg.

  • Dutchman added to urn base

    The block of stone available for this base was too short, so once finished, a dutchman was added to make up for the missing four inches.

  • Dutchman added to urn base

    It is interesting to note that the method used to add this dutchman is the menthod used by the Ancient Greeks to create their columns: They would stack a block, make sure it is level, and then take down the sides.

  • Finished dutchman

    Finished dutchman

  • Ornamental stone urns

    Finished ornamental stone urns with extra large urn in the background.

  • Limestone park bench restoration project

    A bench in a park was damaged when a truck drove into it. The legs were saved but the seat-bench and back needed to be replaced.

  • Assembling the parts of the restored park bench

    Here we see the new pieces of the bench being assembled with steel pints and epoxy.

  • Limestone bench restoration

    Kevin Fehlenberg textured the surface of the bench seat so that the epoxy can grip the seat better, thereby creating a stronger hold on the seat back.

  • Limestone bench seat and back about to be assembled

    Here we see that both the seat back and the bench seat are textured to help the epoxy grip the stone.

  • Process photo of the bench arm

    The photo shows the bench arm in the process of being carved.

Art restoration is a field of its own. But with so few stone carvers left in the country, many get called upon to do restoration work alongside their commissions for original sculpture. Kevin Fehlenberg was introduced to stone restoration while assisting Walter Arnold with two of his restoration projects. Walter has extensive restoration experience, including the Chicago Tribune Tower and the Chicago Board of Trade just to name two. The first project Kevin worked on was a park bench originally carved by Walter, which was damaged by a vehicle. The second was to replace eight urns, which adorned the rooftop of a California luxury home. The designer of the home originally selected cast concrete urns when the home was being built. The quality of these urns proved to be unsatisfactory in material, level of detail and historical accuracy, since the design poorly imitated classical motifs. Walter Arnold was commissioned to replace the unsightly cast concrete urns with handcrafted sculpture made from real stone.

After successfully completing these first two projects, University of Illinois commissioned Kevin to replace the damaged head of a 100 year old stone replica of the Charioteer of Delphi. After guarding the entrance to Allerton Park for a century, the charioteer's head was shattered beyond repair when thieves attempted to steal it. All of these projects you will find pictured here. While stone restoration projects can prove to be quite difficult, Kevin Fehlenberg welcomes them as a challenge and an opportunity to work on historically significant sculpture.